Tag Archives: conference

Playful Learning 2016 #playlearn16

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I’m deep in the planning phase of launching a new and playful conference this July, with my co-chairing colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University (Nic Whitton and Mark Langan).

Our simple concept is to see what engaging things happen at the intersection of learning, play and games. We’re planning the conference around this, eschewing standard ‘paper reading’ sessions for more playful workshops or interactions; arranging some playful activities and surprises around the sessions and through the evenings; but most importantly setting up an environment where the surprising might happen.

Come and join us! http://conference.playthinklearn.net/

We’ll be posting more details on Twitter as the event approaches, too: https://twitter.com/playlearnconf 

 

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#SenateSecrets at FOTE 14

Last Friday (3/10/14) I and my games and learning colleague Katie Piatt spent a day running a conference engagement game for FOTE14. Read all about it in Katie’s marvelous storified tale of the day:

https://storify.com/katiepiatt/senatesecrets-unlock-the-secrets-of-senate-house

 

ALT-GLSIG July 2014: Manchester

For this latest gathering of ALT-GLSIG (the Games and Learning Special Interest Group, hosted by the Association for Learning Technology and chaired by myself and Nicola Whitton), we returned to Manchester. This time, a little further down the road at the University of Manchester’s excellent Alan Gilbert Learning Commons building: an extremely well thought-out and provisioned study/learning space for students next to the main library.

A small corner of the Learning Commons

A small corner of the Learning Commons

These regular SIG meetings are a chance for members to meet and share practice, play games, share ideas and collaborate on projects and writing; but we also like to include the local context: incorporating themes or groups from the host university. Rosie Jones, Commons Manager and long-term SIG member, was our accommodating host, and had invited colleagues from the university along to present and join in with the meeting, which added value to an already packed programme.

Curate-a-fact in full flowWe kicked off on Thursday lunchtime, with 14 members new and old: to get everyone straight into the spirit we played a quick game of Curate-a-fact (the winning group coming up with the intriguing history of ‘Llama Nut Ball’), and ‘people bingo’ (where we each had a list of traits, and had to find people with matches for each): two great ways to get everyone to find out random facts about each other, and start the proceedings in a playful way.

Our first session proper was a discussion about conference games: using games to help attendees network, and engage with the conference themes. This contributed to planning for the FOTE 2014 conference, which members of the SIG were invited to create a game for within the atmospheric surroundings of Senate House. More of this in a later post.

The first of our guest speakers, David Jackson (Manchester Metropolitan University) introduced us to Storyjacker in both digital and paper versions: a fun group writing activity which helps people to collaborate together on a narrative. We had great fun, and generated some impressive prose; with the paper and digital versions offering different experiences. Our second guest speakers were Jonathan Slater and Glenn Painter (NHS Nottingham) who wheeled in an intriguing set of giant boards. Ten minutes later, we were walking through a journey into the minds of recovering therapy patients, played out through a giant game board. It was a great example of how playful experiences can help to bring people together, and open them up to ideas and discussions they might otherwise find difficult.

Picture of painted boards

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy through a board game

Continuing the discussion and games into the evening, we finished by playing the brash but hilarious/cringeworthy Cards against Humanity over a meal in a local hostelry. The Friday began with Katie Piatt asking us to solve the STEM quiz she had devised for a Sussex childrens’ science fair, which was great fun and resulted in puzzle designs for future events. Rosie and her Learning Commons colleague Jade Kelsall then provided us with a challenge: we had to design games to help students engage with eLearning resources. To add further competition, good designs were awarded cubes of plasticine – which were added to growing tall sculptures (the highest structure at the end was awarded a highly detailed plasticine dinosaur: the perfect prize?). It was an excellent, fast and creative way to generate ideas – resulting in some great approaches.

A conference planning session was next up: there is a dearth of conferences covering adult learning games and play (or, indeed, any learning games) for both researchers and practitioners in Europe, and so we brainstormed the possibility of a focussed conference in 2015. A working party, and plenty of playful ideas for structure, themes and other events emerged. Watch this space.

The event finished with a round up of SIG news, and we headed off around midday, to arrive home in time for tea.

All attendees, both existing SIG members and new / invited guests, said how much they had gained from the event – and as ever we were bowled over by everyone’s enthusiasm, creativity and examples of their own, local work. Our next meeting is in November at the University of Hull, where we expect something completely different, yet just as playful.

If you are interested in the work of the ALT-GLSIG, sign up to our group at: http://gamesandlearningsig.ning.com

 

 

 

International Reflections: HETL 2014

Alaskan mountains reflected in lake

It’s not often one gets a chance to visit far-flung parts of the world for work when you’re in higher education;  so as part of the development funds I received for my National Teaching Fellowship, I decided to earmark a couple of international conferences. The Higher Education Teaching and Learning conference was the first of these: organised by the US-based HETL Portal, this year’s conference was taking place in Anchorage, Alaska.

Bear statue on shopfront, AnchorageTwo things were immediately attractive: the location (I’d never visited Alaska but am a big fan of mountains, snow and lakes – and Northern Exposure*), but more importantly, that very location meant that it was attracting participants from every continent: access being easy for Asia and Australasia as much as North and South America. What better chance to get an overview of current issues in higher education across the world?

And so it proved. The attendees were a fascinating mix of senior learning and teaching staff (pro-VCs and equivalent) with innovative and highly engaged ‘regular’ teachers: so whilst one of the spacious, discursive sessions might present 3-4 fascinating case studies of innovative teaching; the next would feature a prolonged discussion around organisational strategy: a perfect professional development experience, on all levels.

Highlights were many, and aided by the edict that there could be no powerpoint (or digital) materials: it was voice and handouts only. This shifted many sessions into very thoughtful narratives or interactive events; with a handful spoiling this by discovering a rogue projector and reverting to reading off their slides. Those who thought about this ‘limitation’, though, delivered. Colin Potts (Georgia Tech., USA) started the conference with a bang by calling HE a ‘blip’ on the lifelong learning landscape: noting that this is the first generation who can’t say “I don’t know” (Google being constantly to hand), and that students are forced by HE to study a narrow subject path, when they are naturally more widely interested. John Doherty and Walter Nolan (Northern Arizona, USA) then guided us in a lively and discursive workshop around engaging colleagues in creative curriculum  design: a conversation from which led to a more relaxed discussion of institution-level curriculum planning with Frank Coton (Vice-Principle Learning & Teaching at Glasgow) over a beer and looking out at the Alaskan mountains from the venue’s 15th-floor “chart room”.

Anchorage street with mountains in distance

A view of snowy mountains in every direction

The following day saw a number of examples of the use of video to engage and support students – in ‘flipped classroom’ approaches and as co-created artefacts for peer support. I presented as part of a session focussed on games-based learning, which drew a large group and resulted in an excellent discussion after the four different, but all interesting, papers (aided, perhaps, by my imported Cadbury’s prizes). iPad use featured heavily in other sessions: my research colleague Claire Hamshire (Manchester Metropolitan) describing her use of iPads for medical teaching; Carrie Moore and Vicki Stieha (Boise State, USA) assigning group roles to students using iPads in a research exercise – and finding that students, when given a clear role, self-policed the group much more effectively; and Kriya Dunlap (Alaska Fairbanks) gave out iPads to his students with initial guidance, but then left them to work out the most effective use for their studies – they ended up co-publishing a paper together on the processes. This latter example is a similar approach to that we’re using with our Medicine first years, to similar positive effect.

A session on institutional change for learning technologies featured some fabulous methods and approaches, such as providing video booths for students to drop in and voice their needs and frustrations (e.g.. “I want my timetable on my smartphone”): which the senior management were so affected by that they implemented a major overhaul of all institutional systems – and staff development plans – to focus on student needs (Brian Webster, Edinburgh Napier). Frederic Fovet (McGill, Canada) described his institution’s application of Universal Design for Learning (UDF) which designs curricula from an inclusive base (so that the whole curriculum is naturally accessible to all). Another fascinating paper came from Jeffrey Schnepp (Bowling Green State, USA) and Christian Rogers (Indiana/Purdue, USA) who used a Professor Layton style method of trading hints for points in end of year exams: students could opt to trade a percentage of the available mark for a hint about the question, on a question by question basis. Their trial is ongoing, but initial results showed a small increase in the average grade, with around 70% of students opting for at least one hint.

There were too many other interesting sessions, discussions and informal chats to mention: in many ways it was a never-ending wave of engaging topics. Conversations went on long into the night, too, courtesy of the midnight sun (the sky looked as if it was noon, around 11pm) and some very good Anchorage restaurants: and even after the conference finished we were still discussing the topics over coffee (finishing with a fascinating chat to David Giles – Flinders, Australia – about focussing on playfulness and the ability to fail, in learning design).

To get the best flights, I was left with a day and half after the conference to explore some of the fantastic scenery around Alaska, and joined Claire and others on a jaw-droppingly-beautiful train journey down to the port at Seward, where we boarded a boat to view whales and other sea life. The following day, we hiked up one of Anchorages smaller mountains, Flattop Mountain, which was still quite a serious climb, rewarded with snow to trample at the top.

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Altogether, HETL 2014 and Alaska made for an amazing, once-in-a-lifetime experience: a fabulous conference, fascinating people, and stunning place. I feel both privileged and humbled to have been part of it.

*Northern Exposure, it turns out, was actually filmed in New York state; and contrary to the strap line, I saw no moose on any corner.
 

UK Museums on the Web 2013

The Museums Computer Group has a long history for a digital group. Set up in 1984, it has brought together and supported anyone with an interest in using digital media or approaches within the museums sector. In more recent times, it has run the excellent UK Museums on the Web conference – less famous internationally than the major US conference of a similar name, but just as inspiring and full of energy.

Curate-a-fact artefact card showing roman lamp

A curate-a-fact artefact card

This year’s, expertly chaired by Mia Ridge, was at the Tate gallery – and in addition to the excellent presentations and conversations (more of that later) I was particularly interested this time in the game we’d planned to get the participants talking and working together from the moment they arrived.

I’d slightly adapted the Curate-a-fact card game I developed for the MCG Play event earlier this year, to work with the expected 150 attendees. Everyone got an artefact card at registration, with the simple game instructions on the back. Over coffee, and the first refreshment break, everyone could be seen comparing cards and working out how they might fit together to form a collection: there was a real buzz in the room, which was great to see. Even better, the players took to Twitter to find/trade teams – a nice co-created twist to the initial design.

A team working hard in the coffee break

Ably assisted by Oonagh Murphy, we supplied the small teams who formed with large sheets to stick their artefacts to, and then write brief names and descriptions of their newly-curated collections. These were gathered up and laid out in the main hall, and everyone given a sticker to vote with.

We had some fabulous, creative entries (selection below) and ended up with two clear winners in the public vote: the Warmongerers, with Don’t Mess With Us (an ‘ultimate’ collection of violence-linked artefacts) and the slightly risqué Pocket Rockets with Or Are You Just Pleased to See Me? (pocket-sized devices through the ages). They shared their prize of a big tin of chocolates around the hall, magnanimously.

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We all agreed that the game was a great success – it was an instant ‘introduction’ tool – getting people talking together right from the start; was simple to grasp, yet led to some detailed and creative ideas generation; and everyone had a great time playing it (in fact we had trouble getting them back into the lecture theatre for the second session). Plus they gave us a new Twitter gameplay twist. Mission accomplished.

The conference itself was equally engaging and well-planned. The theme was ‘Power to the People: working together’ and most of the sessions dealt with harnessing the energy and creative outputs possible from large groups of multi-skilled people. Hannah Freeman talked us through The Guardian Witness scheme, which positively invites and rewards (in both writing credit and hard cash) input to stories from the general public; Tristan Ferne from the BBC’s R&D dept explained how a combination of automated transcription with crowd-sourced editing is producing rich metadata for the massive BBC radio archives. Two other projects dealt particularly with finding the ‘personal’ within the ‘crowd’: Sandra Brauer from English Heritage describing how the Britain from Above project mixes live meetings with online activity ; and Nicole Cama from the Australian National Maritime Museum who shared a fabulous story of linked memories over space and time around material objects (photographs on Flickr Commons).

Other highlights included tales of the remarkable feats achieved by the  public in the Snapshot Serengeti project (by Zooniverse) – pictures posted by hundreds of automated webcams were identified so quickly that the project regularly runs out of data to process! The Imperial War Museum described a novel approach to staff development and embedding digital into museum practice by launching a computer club for staff, in which they played and created with digital media.

But perhaps my favourite example was a smaller-scale crowdsourcing project: Brighton University’s Ten Most Wanted artefact labelling take on the FBI’s similarly named scheme. The idea to crowdsource unknown artefact data is not a new one, but the way that the team put up regular curator posts on the game’s Facebook page (explaining specifically which people, and which data, helped to solve each clue) created a strong yet efficient link with their audience. Conversations on Twitter also liked the idea to limit to ten objects: giving people an achievable target, rather than the usual thousands or tens of thousands of objects.

All in all, there was a buzz of energy throughout the day, a creative and collegiate spirit, and humour (including numerous digs at QR codes). Highly recommended. And while you’re waiting for next year, why not join the MCG – it’s free.

ECGBL 2013 – Porto

Porto-1

Now in its seventh year, the European Conference on Games Based Learning this time brought researchers and practitioners from across Europe (and beyond) to the picturesque town of Porto.

The conference always stands out for its participants and networking opportunities; but this year a ‘learning game competition’ had been added to the bill, which added some industry people as well as academics, making it one of the best yet for discussion and potential collaborations.

The papers themselves were a mixed bag: several presented a worrying return of the worst ‘serious game’ approach to learning games: designing basic subject quizzes with a graphical or gamified wrapper, with no pre- or post- evaluation of the approach. These hold the field back rather than helping to take it further.  But they contrasted with others which were truly thoughtful and provocative: great for filling the generous 30-minute slots with some detailed questioning and discussion.

Highlights for me were:

  • A ‘nuclear threat’ pervasive game used by Trygve Pløhn to teach action script programming, which sat alongside standard classes to apply the students’ skills to real life situations. What was most interesting was the way Trygve used real-life breaking news from Iran to adjust his story as it unfolded, engaging the students as he went.
  • Stine Ejsing-Duun and Thorkild Hanghøj presented a fascinating lens on pervasive games, looking at an example from a high school where children tried to ‘cheat’ the system to gain points or advantage: they posed the question – is this really cheating, or creativity? And presented theoretical axes to house the different examples of cheating/creative work they had observed.
  • Several papers focussed on using game design workshops for group training (teacher training, student group work etc.), which were all successful – the best ones based on rapid paper prototyping as described by Nathalie Charlier and Nicola Whitton (the MAGICAL project). Hanghoj, in another paper, focussed on carrying on the development after the design workshops, leading to a good discussion about transfer/reflection activities afterwards.
  • Anna Arici and Sasha Barab (of Quest Atlantis fame, from Arizona State University) presented their new Atlantis Remixed project, which uses Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein setting to teach students critical thinking, ethical and other skills through a compellingly designed game interface. What was more interesting still were the student and teacher dashboards they are developing to allow students to collect and describe their skills from various games/activities in one place; and allow teachers to track the development of pupils in real time.
  • I presented the beginnings of an investigation into the use of real contexts within learning games and activities, for which I gathered a wealth of material and comments from the audience members. I’ll present these ideas and additions in a future post.
  • Robyn Hromek, from the University of Sydney, presented her psychology-based range of home made games which she uses to help troubled children in Sydney schools. Based around psychology theory, the games were interesting in that they use very little competition, and instead focus on collaboration and helping other players.
Barrels in the Taylors Port Cellar

The Taylors Port Cellar

The first day ended with a leisurely walk through the picturesque streets and river bank of the city, culminating with a tour of one of the Port-wine manufacturer’s cellars and a meal/tasting session, which was a lovely touch and a little immersion into the local culture.

The second day closed with the results of the game design competition, which Atlantis Remixed deservedly won – with a hand-made and very clever Chemistry board game/activity ChemNerd from Jakob Thomas Holm coming second (especially interesting for its multiple events linking each stage of chemistry investigation – ending with a real live experiment). Third place went to Ian Hook and Roman Hodek of Lipa Learning, who presented their ambitious linked range of iPad games for 2-6 year olds.

All in all, I met some fabulous and fascinating new people, discussed some intriguing and important new and old approaches, and topped it off with a fine glass of port. Not a bad couple of days at all.

Game design winners: Holm, Barab and Hook

Game design winners: Holm, Barab and Hook

 

Storyville – the HEA A&H Conference 2013

Image by musical photo man, http://www.flickr.com/photos/7622958@N04/6659134537/

I’d been looking forward to  Storyville 2013, the Higher Education Academy’s 2013 Arts and Humanities conference, for two reasons: firstly, the excellent title/theme of narratives and storytelling; secondly, the fact that the first combined HEA Arts & Humanities conference in 2012 had been one of the most rewarding I’d attended.

The theme ensured that many of the presenters had thought much harder about what they were proposing – and the range of flexible session types with an emphasis on interaction (short and long workshops, ‘wildcard’ sessions,  panels) meant that the usual sit-and-listen stance of an academic conference was very definitely not in evidence. This, combined with a very convivial setting in the large open plan ground floor of the Thistle Hotel in Brighton, ensured that there were always interesting stories, thoughts and chatter to be found.

I’d been invited to begin the conference by attending one of the HEA’s policy breakfasts – this particular one on the multitude of pertinent issues changing the face of Higher Education currently. From a range of discipline bases we discussed the effect of fees, shifting socioeconomic student makeup, and the role of academic and transferrable skills. I was impressed by the level of discussion and range of responses offered, and it is pleasing to see the HEA taking a proactive yet communal role in considering such key issues.

The opening keynote, from Vicky Gunn (Director of the Learning and Teaching Centre, University of Glasgow), drew on her own subject base of early medieval philosophy, to question the “tall tales we tell about teaching”: which stories we inherit from our own experience as students or apprentices, and which ones we choose to pervade or reject when faced with new and changing narratives as lecturers. There was to be no soft anodyne start to this remarkable conference: Vicky both commanded and rewarded thoughtful attention, as she introduced her ideas through some engaging personal stories.

Photograph by Katie Piatt: http://www.flickr.com/photos/katiepiatt/8880808116/in/set-72157633789726964It was straight into my own session then, taking a room of participants through an energetic, mildly competitive game design workshop (using the model I developed with Nic Whitton, but this time ably delivered with Katie Piatt, who popped in from her local University of Brighton and also captured the session beautifully in photographs). A number of compelling stories, and very workable games, emerged 90 minutes later.

Sadly, I was only able to stay for the first of the two days, due to a conflicting invitation to another excellent event (report to follow); but even the one day was full to the brim of interesting and challenging sessions. Before a good lunch,  short papers covered the use of the Hunger Games as a metaphor for teacher training (in particular, equipping oneself effectively and creatively for particular challenges); and the use of abstracts as a peer discussion/reflection tool for students submitting essays – this latter paper gave rise to a really interesting discussion of the use of shorter summaries (abstracts, précis, even one line and 140 character forms) to encourage reflection on the main structure and arguments in an essay; and to provide peers with an easy way to compare approaches in a tutorial or seminar setting.

In the afternoon, I chose two longer workshops for their challenging natures. The first presented Keith Turvey’s narrative ecology heuristic as a way to make sense of professional (and personal) identities. Working with a colleague who runs the HE programmes at Circus Space (in itself an interesting challenge in mapping contexts) we struggled at first with the approach, thinking it to be over-dependent on technical determinism; but working with Keith we found it quite rewarding to use his ‘arch’ structure as a way to think about dependencies: aspects of persona which need other aspects to cement or grow them. By the end of the session we could see some use in using this with students to reflect on their own academic and professional development. The second workshop was way out of my comfort zone – the use of dance to investigate the state of ‘flow’ (Csikszentmihalyi) as a measure of connectedness/engagement with a learning activity. Although my own attempts stopped fairly early and I retired to the sides to watch (and no, there is no video evidence), our observation/participation was used to great effect in the prolonged discussion afterwards (a good half an hour after the workshop was due to finish), covering a range of methods one might use to observe/measure flow in more traditional learning sessions – and why one might want to.

The day finished with the conference dinner, where more stories were shared over an excellent meal. By the end of a long day (8am to midnight), my head was spinning with the range of different tales I’d been part of. Although my own narrative shifted to Belfast the next day, I kept a close eye on the busy Twitter stream (collected here) which gave glimpses of further fascinating narratives.

As we discussed over dinner, it is hard to see how the Arts & Humanities team can top this next year: but with two excellent, thoroughly interesting/stimulating events to their belt, I’m sure they’ll have a good go.